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CHANGES TO NATIONAL INSURANCE CONTRIBUTIONS AND INTRODUCING THE HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE LEVY

Based on information available as at 24th September 2021

INTRODUCTION


The government recently announced tax changes to fund £12 billion a year to be spent on the NHS and social care across the UK.


WHAT ARE THE CHANGES FROM APRIL 2022?


National Insurance contributions (NICs) will increase by 1.25% for one year only for employees, employers and the self-employed. This will cover both Class 1 (employee and employer), Class 1A and 1B and Class 4 (self-employed) NICs. Those above State Pension Age are not impacted by the April 2022 changes.


WHAT ARE THE CHANGES FROM APRIL 2023?


A new ring-fenced Health and Social Care Levy of 1.25% will be introduced which will apply to those who pay Class 1 (employee and employer), Class 1A and 1B and Class 4 (self-employed) NICs and will also be extended to those over State Pension age who are in work. When the new levy comes into effect, National Insurance rates will revert back to current levels.

The levy will also apply to individuals above State Pension age with employment income or profits from self-employment above £9,568.


The levy will be administered by HMRC and collected through the current reporting and collection procedures for NICs – Pay As You Earn and Income Tax Self-Assessment.

Like National Insurance, levy contributions will apply UK-wide, people will pay the same in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


From 2023-24, levy contributions will need to appear as a separate item on payslips. Where possible a generic message should be included payslips for the next tax year (2022-23). More information on payslip requirements will be available in due course.


Small businesses will still be able to offset the £4000 employment allowance against their employers NIC liability.


For workers operating through personal service companies to whom the new ‘off-payroll’ working rules apply will also be caught by the proposed measures.


The 1.25% additional levy doesn’t just apply to national insurance contributions, it is proposed that the income from share dividends, earned by those who own shares in companies, will also see a 1.25% tax increase from April 2022. This would mean that after the £2,000 tax free dividend allowance the rate of tax would be 8.75% for basic rate taxpayers, 33.75% for higher rate taxpayers and 39.35% for those with income in excess of £150,000 a year. The change to dividend rates is expected to continue into the 2023/24 tax year.


Also from October 2023, anyone with assets of less than £20,000 will not have to make any contribution for their care from their savings or the value of their home, ensuring those with the least are protected. Anyone with assets of between £20,000 and £100,000 will be eligible for some means-tested support, helping people without substantial assets.


HOW CAN EMPLOYERS AND WORKERS PLAN FOR THE CHANGES?


The announcement of the proposed changes more than six months before they take effect means that there is time to reduce the impact. Employees could consider agreeing a salary sacrifice arrangement with their employer, for example sacrificing their £5,000 annual bonus for an additional pension contribution paid by their employer. Such an arrangement would save 1.25% NICs for both employee and employer as well as £2,000 income tax where the employee is a higher rate taxpayer.


Employees might also consider a salary sacrifice in favour of an electric company car.


Shareholder/directors of family companies could consider bringing forward dividend payments to before 6 April 2022. Such a strategy needs careful planning as if the extra dividend takes the taxpayer’s income above £50,270 the excess would be taxable at the 32.5% rate instead of the 7.5% rate.


HMRC:


For more information from HMRC please visit the link below:


https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/our-plan-for-health-and-social-care



This summary is published for the information of clients. It provides only an overview of the main points, and no action should be taken without consulting the detailed legislation or seeking professional advice. Therefore no responsibility for loss occasioned by any person acting or refraining from action as a result of the material contained in this summary can be accepted by the authors or the firm.

 

Brayne, Williams & Barnard Limited


Rosemount House, Rosemount Avenue, West Byfleet, Surrey, KT14 6LB


tel 01932 350117

email info@bwbca.com

web www.bwbca.com

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